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Homeowner shoots home invasion suspect
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Homeowner shoots home invasion suspect

Homeowner shoots home invasion suspect
Photo Credit: Matt Augustine
Police survey the crime scene outside 2155 Wiley Oaks Lane after a home invasion went wrong...for the suspects, at least.

Homeowner shoots home invasion suspect

Jacksonville police are investigating what happened during a home invasion just before noon today that ended with the homeowner shooting a suspect.  The incident happened on Wiley Oaks Lane off Old Middleburg Road on the Westside.

That's where police are searching for more than one suspect who tried to break-in to a home but they were greeted by the gun of the homeowner.  9-year old Ziare Anderson, a neighbor, says he was getting the mail when saw one of the suspects stumbling out from behind the house.  Ziare says he stumbled out into the street and fell to the ground, bleeding from his chest. That person was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

Police say they believe there were three suspects involved.  No arrests have been made yet, but they are still searching for the two who left the scene unharmed.  Sergeant Jay Farhat with JSO says they'll have more information as to the circumstances of the incident once they've interviewed the people who were in the house when the suspects broke in.

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  • With a partial government shutdown showing no signs of being resolved, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday basically ‘disinvited’ President Donald Trump from a scheduled January 29 State of the Union Address, saying that the Secret Service and Homeland Security Department should not be tasked with such a major event while they are in a shutdown status. “Sadly, given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened,” Pelosi wrote in a letter sent to the President on Wednesday morning. There was no immediate reaction from the White House or the President. The President gives the State of the Union at the invitation of the Congress, as the House and Senate must agree to use the House chamber for such an event. The reaction in Congress split down party lines. “It is very ironic that Democrats reference security concerns in their latest grandstanding tactic, delaying the State of the Union, but will not address the security concerns that are creating a humanitarian crisis at the border,” said Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN). “We know the state of our union,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), as Democrats said there should be no speech from the President while the partial shutdown continues. In an interview with NBC News, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said the President had been “disinvited” by Pelosi.

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