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Police investigating deadly shooting across from Jacksonville University

Police investigating deadly shooting across from Jacksonville University

Police are actively investigating a deadly shooting steps away from Jacksonville University late Sunday night. JSO says they were called out to the River City Landing apartment complex and when they got there they found two people shot in a vehicle in the middle of University Boulevard. Police say they were taken to a hospital where one died and the other has life-threatening injuries.  JSO says the shooting happened inside the complex and the two shot tried to leave after the shooting. JSO says there were other people inside the vehicle when the shots rang out and they were interviewing them. At this time, police don’t have any suspect description, but they say people in the area are not in any danger. If you have any information on this shooting give JSO a call at 904-630-0500 or call Crime Stoppers at  1-866-845-TIPS.

More humid, more thunderstorms for the week 

More humid, more thunderstorms for the week 

As you plan out your week, expect to see an increase in showers and thunderstorms. Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says scattered storms today will mainly be inland.  “But as we go through the week we’ll see a little bit of a pattern change, a little bit of a wind change,  and that means showers and storms at times will make it all the way to the beaches. The winds will be more out of the west and southwest”, said Buresh.  It'll be hot and humid, especially later in the week, with feel-like temps climbing to near or above 100 degrees.

Iran says it will break uranium stockpile limit in 10 days

Iran says it will break uranium stockpile limit in 10 days

Iran will break the uranium stockpile limit set by Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers in the next 10 days, the spokesman for the country's atomic agency said Monday while also warning that Iran could enrich uranium up to 20% — just a step away from weapons-grade levels. The announcement by Behrouz Kamalvandi, timed for a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Brussels, puts more pressure on Europe to come up with new terms for Iran's 2015 nuclear deal. The deal has steadily unraveled since the Trump administration pulled America out of the accord last year and re-imposed tough economic sanctions on Iran, deeply cutting into its sale of crude oil abroad and sending its economy into freefall. Europe has so far been unable to offer Iran a way around the U.S. sanctions. The development comes in the wake of apparent attacks on oil tankers last week in the Mideast, assaults that Washington has blamed on Iran. While Iran has denied being involved, it has used mines in the past against commercial traffic around the crucial Strait of Hormuz, through which a fifth of the world's crude oil passes. Kamalvandi accused Europeans of 'killing time' as the clock runs down. 'If this condition continues, there will be no deal' anymore, Kamalvandi said. President Hassan Rouhani, greeting France's new ambassador to Tehran on Monday, similarly warned that time was running out for the deal. 'The current situation is very critical and France and the other parties to the (deal) still have a very limited opportunity to play their historic role for saving the deal,' Rouhani said, according to his website. Under terms of the nuclear deal, Iran can keep a stockpile of no more than 300 kilograms (660 pounds) of low-enriched uranium. Kamalvandi said that given Iran's recent decision to quadruple its production of low-enriched uranium, it would pass the 300-kilogram limit on Thursday, June 27. The United Nations nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, said last month that Iran still remained within its stockpile limits. The Vienna-based agency declined to comment Monday on Iran's announcement. Kamalvandi said Iran needs 5% enrichment for its nuclear power plant in southern Iranian port of Bushehr and it also needs 20% enrichment for a Tehran research reactor. The nuclear deal had limited Iran to enriching uranium only to 3.67%, which is enough for power plants and peaceful purposes. But after America's pullout and escalated sanctions, Tehran set a July 7 deadline for Europe to come up with better terms for the deal, or it would take additional steps away from the accord, likely meaning it would boost enrichment further. Kamalvandi enforced that stance, saying that Tehran will increase uranium enrichment levels 'based on the country's needs.' Enriching a supply of uranium means boosting its concentration of the type of uranium that can power a nuclear reaction. That type, or isotope, is called U-235. Enrichment basically means stripping away atoms of another isotope, called U-238. Boosting its purity to 20% means removing 22 more unwanted isotopes per atom of U-235, while going from there to 90% purity means removing just four more per atom of U-235. Ninety percent is considered weapons-grade material. That means going from 20% to 90% is a relatively quicker process, something that worries nuclear nonproliferation experts. Iran maintains its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes. Iran reached its nuclear deal with world powers in 2015, agreeing to limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. Since President Donald Trump took office, the U.S. has steadily stripped away at the accord. Trump pulled America out of the deal in May 2018. Tensions have ratcheted up in the region since last month. The U.S. rushed an aircraft carrier strike group and other military assets to the Mideast in response to what it said were threats from Iran. Meanwhile, a series of mysterious attacks have targeted oil tankers and Iranian-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen have launched a series of drone and missile attacks on Saudi Arabia. Gen. Mohammad Hossein Bagheri, the chief of the general staff of Iran's armed forces, denied Tehran was involved in the ship attacks, saying Monday the country only would respond in 'an open, strong and severe way' if needed. However, Iran's paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, which the U.S. suspects in the attacks, answers only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and operates outside of the army's control. Kamalvandi spoke to Iranian journalists in a news conference at the country's Arak heavy water nuclear reactor. Such reactors produce plutonium that can be used in nuclear weapons. Iran, under the nuclear deal, had reconfigured the facility to address Western concerns on that issue. However, Kamalvandi said the country could rebuild the facility to make it produce plutonium. He also said Iran would continue to allow the U.N. to inspect its nuclear facilities for the time being. The U.S. alleges Iran used limpet mines to target two tankers last Thursday, pointing to black-and-white footage it captured that American officials describe as an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel removing an unexploded mine from the Japanese-operated tanker Kokuka Courageous, one of the two ships that were targeted. The Japanese tanker's owner said its crew described 'flying objects' as having targeted the vessel. In Brussels on Monday, European Union foreign ministers said they were still looking for more information on who might be behind the incident involving the tankers. Germany and others insisted they need a clearer picture before wading into a diplomatic conflict which could have serious implications in the Middle East. German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said that U.S. and British intelligence needs to be compared with other information from allies. 'We have to be very careful,' he said. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said it was not a time to jump to action without proper information. 'The maximum restraint and wisdom should be applied,' she said ahead of the monthly foreign ministers meeting in Luxembourg. ___ Gambrell reported from Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Associated Press writers Raf Casert in Brussels and Frank Jordans in Berlin contributed to this report. ___ This story has been corrected to show that Iran announced it would pass the stockpile limit on Thursday, June 27, instead of Thursday, July 27.

It’s a screaming message from emergency leaders across Florida. Look at who stayed behind as Hurricane Michael slammed ashore as a Category 5 hurricane in the Florida Panhandle.   News 104.5 WOKV brought together a panel of experts, led by Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh, to talk through steps that you can take to protect your family, your property or your business for a disaster up to an including a hurricane.   Listen for the story of one family that chose to ride out Hurricane Michael in their attic, only to lose the home after the storm had passed.  The mistake they made is one that Mike Buresh says he will never forget. 
It’s a screaming message from emergency leaders across Florida. Look at who stayed behind as Hurricane Michael slammed ashore as a Category 5 hurricane in the Florida Panhandle.   News 104.5 WOKV brought together a panel of experts, led by Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh, to talk through steps that you can take to protect your family, your property or your business for a disaster up to an including a hurricane.   Listen for the story of one family that chose to ride out Hurricane Michael in their attic, only to lose the home after the storm had passed.  The mistake they made is one that Mike Buresh says he will never forget. 
It’s a screaming message from emergency leaders across Florida. Look at who stayed behind as Hurricane Michael slammed ashore as a Category 5 hurricane in the Florida Panhandle.   News 104.5 WOKV brought together a panel of experts, led by Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh, to talk through steps that you can take to protect your family, your property or your business for a disaster up to an including a hurricane.   Listen for the story of one family that chose to ride out Hurricane Michael in their attic, only to lose the home after the storm had passed.  The mistake they made is one that Mike Buresh says he will never forget. 
It’s a screaming message from emergency leaders across Florida. Look at who stayed behind as Hurricane Michael slammed ashore as a Category 5 hurricane in the Florida Panhandle.   News 104.5 WOKV brought together a panel of experts, led by Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh, to talk through steps that you can take to protect your family, your property or your business for a disaster up to an including a hurricane.   Listen for the story of one family that chose to ride out Hurricane Michael in their attic, only to lose the home after the storm had passed.  The mistake they made is one that Mike Buresh says he will never forget. 
With no earmarks in Congress, the Executive Branch hands out the pork With rules that make it difficult for lawmakers to steer taxpayer dollars into home state projects - that doesn't mean less money is being spent for such items - as instead billions of dollars in grants are being handed out by the Executive Branch each year, with federal bureaucrats taking the place of lawmakers in deciding how to dole out money approved by Congress for a variety of programs. A decade ago for example, Congress would have approved a highway bill filled with pages and pages of specific projects to be funded back in their states - but now, Congress funds billions in generic grants for the Department of Transportation, and then watches as the money is handed out by the feds. Experts say voters probably don't understand that what some would deride as 'pork barrel spending' just been shifted from the Legislative Branch to the Executive Branch. 'Presidents — and their appointees — engage in pork-barrel politicking (earmarking) in the same way Congress does,' wrote John Hudak of the Brookings Institute, who argues that budget 'earmarks' should be brought back in the House and Senate. Here are some examples of money sent out for highway and transit projects by the feds: Some lawmakers say they should be the ones deciding where that money goes - not a bureaucrat who maybe has never been to their state. 'We all should be able to stand behind the work that we do and advertise to our constituents and everybody around the country as to why this is a priority,' said Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK). 'If people think we are quote saving money,' Murkowski told reporters, 'they are fooling themselves, because those dollars are still going out the door.' But there are also Republicans who think Congress should just stay away from pork barrel spending. 'Earmarks grease the skids for bigger government,' said Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE). But regardless of complaints about how big the federal deficit might be, and how much is being spent overall, lawmakers of both parties trumpet the arrival of money for the folks back home - with federal agencies joining in those announcements as well. There are so many grants offered by the U.S. Government that a special website was set up to help people find out more information about what's available. Going through many of the grants, what one notices right away is the wide swath of money available for all sorts of matters: + Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) USA Cooperative Agreement Program + Invasive and Noxious Plant Management  + Forest and Woodlands Resource Management + Cultural Landscape Inventory for the Navajo Settlement  + Longitudinal Research on Delinquency and Crime  One grant available right now from the National Institutes of Health deals with research into dementia, 'to conduct new research on automobile technology for signaling early signs of cognitive impairment in older drivers.' In recent weeks, President Trump has made it clear that he's ready to use support for specific home-state spending matters to his electoral advantage, too. The focus on local spending is not new - almost ten years ago, I wrote about the proliferation of grants, and how the executive branch was handing out the pork. And it's still happening today.