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Serial bank robbery suspect caught

Serial bank robbery suspect caught

The FBI says a serial bank robbery suspect is now off the streets, a day after he held up a bank in Clay County. Myron Ernst is accused of targeting two Clay County banks in the last month and a half, including a Bank of America in early October, and a SunTrust Bank on Blanding Boulevard yesterday. He’s accused of several other robberies in Florida and Alabama.  The Ocala Police Department says they have an attempted armed robbery charge out against Ernst, for an incident on Tuesday. They say he was pulled over on a traffic violation in Lakeland today, and he was taken in to custody at that time.

Democrats continue 2018 election gains in House

Democrats continue 2018 election gains in House

In what has almost been a daily event since Election Day last week, Democrats won another GOP seat in the House on Thursday, as a new form of runoff election in Maine knocked off a Republican incumbent, increasing the gains of Democrats to 35 seats, with seven GOP seats still undecided. In Maine, Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME) had asked a federal judge to block the final tabulation of results in his district under the format known as “ranked choice voting” – but the judge refused, saying that was a political question, as Maine voters had approved the new runoff format twice in statewide elections. Poliquin is the 26th House GOP incumbent to be defeated in last week’s elections; Democrats lead in three of the seven remaining undecided House races, while Repulbicans are ahead in the other four – as Democrats could win three or four more seats. “Now we’re getting up to forty,” said House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. “That’s really a very big – almost a tsunami,” arguing that Democrats had to overcome Republican gerrymanders to notch their victories. At her press conference, Nancy Pelosi notes this year's freshman Dem class is the biggest since 1974 'Watergate babies.' “I don’t know if this Congress will name itself, but we’re almost close to 60 new Democrats,” she says. — Ella Nilsen (@ella_nilsen) November 15, 2018 Regardless of what term you use to describe the gains by Democrats in the House, it will be the party’s biggest pickup since 1974, a class that was dubbed, “the Watergate babies,” when Democrats gained 49 seats. Overall, there will most likely be over 90 new members of the House, getting close to the total change in the Tea Party midterm election of 2010, when 94 new members arrived on Capitol Hill. While Pelosi expressed excitement about the growing number of new Democrats in the Congress, she flashed a bit of impatience with reporters on Thursday, as they pestered her again with questions about whether she would have the votes to once again be Speaker of the House. “I intend to win the Speakership,” said Pelosi, who served as Speaker for four years between 2007 and 2011. “I have overwhelming support in my caucus to be Speaker of the House,” Pelosi added, even as other Democrats were trying to come up with another candidate to oppose her. PELOSI latest: 1. Rep Jayapal isnt saying where she is – told us she, Rep. Pocan are meeting w Pelosi later. 2. Rep. Richmond (CBC chair) said he is not anti-Pelosi but if Fudge runs he will likely support. Also said he spoke w Fudge today and she did not bring up Speaker run. — Lisa Desjardins (@LisaDNews) November 15, 2018 Pressed by reporters at a news conference, Pelosi said she would welcome a challenge by Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-OH), or anyone else. “I say it to everybody, come on in, the water’s warm,” Pelosi said. While Republicans held their leadership elections this week – House Democrats won’t vote until after Thanksgiving.

Florida Highway Patrol identifies people killed in head-on crash in Green Cove Springs

Florida Highway Patrol identifies people killed in head-on crash in Green Cove Springs

The Florida Highway Patrol has identified the two people who died Wednesday in a head-on crash in Green Cove Springs. Kaitlyn Kane, 21, was driving south on Russell Road in a Honda Accord near Old Blue Den Road when she tried to pass another vehicle in a no-passing zone, according to the Highway Patrol.  The car veered back into the southbound lane but continued onto the grass shoulder before going back into the road and into the path of a van in the northbound lane.  The two vehicles crashed into each other, ejecting Kane from the Honda, according to the FHP. Troy Livingston, 21, of Green Cove Springs was also in the vehicle, and he died.  The FHP says Kane was from Richmond, Texas.  The two people in the van were both taken to the hospital, and the driver was listed in serious condition, according to the FHP. Kane was not wearing a seat belt.

The Latest on Florida's election recount (all times local): 3 p.m. Florida counties have reached the deadline for submitting the results of their election recounts. A federal judge earlier rejected a request to give counties more time beyond the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline to finish their recounts. Palm Beach County's election supervisor had warned that the county would not be able to complete the recount on time. The election will be certified Tuesday. The state's 67 counties were required to do machine recounts of more than 8 million ballots cast in the contentious midterms. The U.S. Senate and governor's races were among the three within the vote margin to trigger a machine recount. Several lawsuits have been filed by Democrats and Republicans in the wake of the close election. ___ 2 p.m. A federal judge is refusing to suspend looming election recount deadlines in the battleground state of Florida. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker on Thursday rejected a request by U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Democrats to give counties more time to finish recounts. All 67 counties are required to submit the results of a machine recount by 3 p.m. Palm Beach County's election supervisor has already warned that the county will not be able to finish on time. In his ruling, Walker said he was concerned that some counties may not complete their work by the deadline. But he said there is a lack of information on when Palm Beach County would wrap up its work. Walker said he cannot 'fashion a remedy in the dark.' ___ Noon The supervisor of elections in Florida's Palm Beach County said the likelihood of her office completing the recount by the state-mandated 3 p.m. deadline is 'very slim.' Susan Bucher defended her office Thursday morning, saying the incomplete recount wasn't 'for lack of human effort.' Bucher explained that the elections office in Riviera Beach shut down Wednesday night because 'when you work about 45 hours in a row, you have to let people sleep.' Bucher says she believes her office did everything it could despite not completing the U.S. Senate race recount. She blames aging equipment for the delays in meeting Thursday's deadline for machine recount results. ___ 10:15 a.m. A federal judge is sharply criticizing Florida legislators and elections officials in Palm Beach County for the state's chronic recount issues. During a hearing on whether to extend the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline in the state's recount for a U.S. Senate seat the governor's race, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker noted that Florida has a history of 'razor thin' elections, yet Palm Beach County delayed purchasing enough voting machines to handle a recount. Walker said Florida has been 'the laughing stock of the world election after election and we chose not to fix this.' The judge also said that the recount procedure in Florida law is written in a way that doesn't allow for possible problems. He suggested that runs against past federal court rulings, including the Bush v. Gore ruling that decided the 2000 presidential recount. ___ 7:45 a.m. A federal judge is giving thousands of Florida voters until this weekend to fix their ballots if they haven't been counted because of mismatched signatures. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled early Thursday that current Florida law on mail-in ballots places a substantial burden on voters. The ruling comes as Florida is wrapping up a recount in three statewide races. Walker did not go along with a request from Democrats to count all ballots with mismatched signatures. Instead he ordered that local election officials give voters until 5 p.m. Saturday to correct the problem so that their ballots can be counted. State officials testified in court that nearly 4,000 ballots have already been rejected because local canvassing boards decided the signature that was mailed-in doesn't match the signature on file. ___ 3 a.m. Florida's bumpy recount election reaches a pivotal point Thursday as most counties across the state complete reviews that could determine the next senator and governor in one of America's top political battlegrounds. Barring a dramatic last minute court-mandated extension, Florida counties face a 3 p.m. deadline to wrap up their machine recounts. Some counties have warned that they may not be able to make the deadline. The machine recount may essentially bring a conclusion to the governor's race. Republican Ron DeSantis leads Democrat Andrew Gillum by 0.41 percentage points in unofficial results, but the election won't be certified until Tuesday. Unofficial results in the U.S. Senate race have Republican Gov. Rick Scott ahead of Nelson by 0.14 percentage points, which will almost certainly send it to another recount that will last through the weekend.
The Latest on Florida's election recount (all times local): 3 p.m. Florida counties have reached the deadline for submitting the results of their election recounts. A federal judge earlier rejected a request to give counties more time beyond the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline to finish their recounts. Palm Beach County's election supervisor had warned that the county would not be able to complete the recount on time. The election will be certified Tuesday. The state's 67 counties were required to do machine recounts of more than 8 million ballots cast in the contentious midterms. The U.S. Senate and governor's races were among the three within the vote margin to trigger a machine recount. Several lawsuits have been filed by Democrats and Republicans in the wake of the close election. ___ 2 p.m. A federal judge is refusing to suspend looming election recount deadlines in the battleground state of Florida. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker on Thursday rejected a request by U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Democrats to give counties more time to finish recounts. All 67 counties are required to submit the results of a machine recount by 3 p.m. Palm Beach County's election supervisor has already warned that the county will not be able to finish on time. In his ruling, Walker said he was concerned that some counties may not complete their work by the deadline. But he said there is a lack of information on when Palm Beach County would wrap up its work. Walker said he cannot 'fashion a remedy in the dark.' ___ Noon The supervisor of elections in Florida's Palm Beach County said the likelihood of her office completing the recount by the state-mandated 3 p.m. deadline is 'very slim.' Susan Bucher defended her office Thursday morning, saying the incomplete recount wasn't 'for lack of human effort.' Bucher explained that the elections office in Riviera Beach shut down Wednesday night because 'when you work about 45 hours in a row, you have to let people sleep.' Bucher says she believes her office did everything it could despite not completing the U.S. Senate race recount. She blames aging equipment for the delays in meeting Thursday's deadline for machine recount results. ___ 10:15 a.m. A federal judge is sharply criticizing Florida legislators and elections officials in Palm Beach County for the state's chronic recount issues. During a hearing on whether to extend the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline in the state's recount for a U.S. Senate seat the governor's race, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker noted that Florida has a history of 'razor thin' elections, yet Palm Beach County delayed purchasing enough voting machines to handle a recount. Walker said Florida has been 'the laughing stock of the world election after election and we chose not to fix this.' The judge also said that the recount procedure in Florida law is written in a way that doesn't allow for possible problems. He suggested that runs against past federal court rulings, including the Bush v. Gore ruling that decided the 2000 presidential recount. ___ 7:45 a.m. A federal judge is giving thousands of Florida voters until this weekend to fix their ballots if they haven't been counted because of mismatched signatures. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled early Thursday that current Florida law on mail-in ballots places a substantial burden on voters. The ruling comes as Florida is wrapping up a recount in three statewide races. Walker did not go along with a request from Democrats to count all ballots with mismatched signatures. Instead he ordered that local election officials give voters until 5 p.m. Saturday to correct the problem so that their ballots can be counted. State officials testified in court that nearly 4,000 ballots have already been rejected because local canvassing boards decided the signature that was mailed-in doesn't match the signature on file. ___ 3 a.m. Florida's bumpy recount election reaches a pivotal point Thursday as most counties across the state complete reviews that could determine the next senator and governor in one of America's top political battlegrounds. Barring a dramatic last minute court-mandated extension, Florida counties face a 3 p.m. deadline to wrap up their machine recounts. Some counties have warned that they may not be able to make the deadline. The machine recount may essentially bring a conclusion to the governor's race. Republican Ron DeSantis leads Democrat Andrew Gillum by 0.41 percentage points in unofficial results, but the election won't be certified until Tuesday. Unofficial results in the U.S. Senate race have Republican Gov. Rick Scott ahead of Nelson by 0.14 percentage points, which will almost certainly send it to another recount that will last through the weekend.
The Latest on Florida's election recount (all times local): 3 p.m. Florida counties have reached the deadline for submitting the results of their election recounts. A federal judge earlier rejected a request to give counties more time beyond the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline to finish their recounts. Palm Beach County's election supervisor had warned that the county would not be able to complete the recount on time. The election will be certified Tuesday. The state's 67 counties were required to do machine recounts of more than 8 million ballots cast in the contentious midterms. The U.S. Senate and governor's races were among the three within the vote margin to trigger a machine recount. Several lawsuits have been filed by Democrats and Republicans in the wake of the close election. ___ 2 p.m. A federal judge is refusing to suspend looming election recount deadlines in the battleground state of Florida. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker on Thursday rejected a request by U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Democrats to give counties more time to finish recounts. All 67 counties are required to submit the results of a machine recount by 3 p.m. Palm Beach County's election supervisor has already warned that the county will not be able to finish on time. In his ruling, Walker said he was concerned that some counties may not complete their work by the deadline. But he said there is a lack of information on when Palm Beach County would wrap up its work. Walker said he cannot 'fashion a remedy in the dark.' ___ Noon The supervisor of elections in Florida's Palm Beach County said the likelihood of her office completing the recount by the state-mandated 3 p.m. deadline is 'very slim.' Susan Bucher defended her office Thursday morning, saying the incomplete recount wasn't 'for lack of human effort.' Bucher explained that the elections office in Riviera Beach shut down Wednesday night because 'when you work about 45 hours in a row, you have to let people sleep.' Bucher says she believes her office did everything it could despite not completing the U.S. Senate race recount. She blames aging equipment for the delays in meeting Thursday's deadline for machine recount results. ___ 10:15 a.m. A federal judge is sharply criticizing Florida legislators and elections officials in Palm Beach County for the state's chronic recount issues. During a hearing on whether to extend the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline in the state's recount for a U.S. Senate seat the governor's race, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker noted that Florida has a history of 'razor thin' elections, yet Palm Beach County delayed purchasing enough voting machines to handle a recount. Walker said Florida has been 'the laughing stock of the world election after election and we chose not to fix this.' The judge also said that the recount procedure in Florida law is written in a way that doesn't allow for possible problems. He suggested that runs against past federal court rulings, including the Bush v. Gore ruling that decided the 2000 presidential recount. ___ 7:45 a.m. A federal judge is giving thousands of Florida voters until this weekend to fix their ballots if they haven't been counted because of mismatched signatures. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled early Thursday that current Florida law on mail-in ballots places a substantial burden on voters. The ruling comes as Florida is wrapping up a recount in three statewide races. Walker did not go along with a request from Democrats to count all ballots with mismatched signatures. Instead he ordered that local election officials give voters until 5 p.m. Saturday to correct the problem so that their ballots can be counted. State officials testified in court that nearly 4,000 ballots have already been rejected because local canvassing boards decided the signature that was mailed-in doesn't match the signature on file. ___ 3 a.m. Florida's bumpy recount election reaches a pivotal point Thursday as most counties across the state complete reviews that could determine the next senator and governor in one of America's top political battlegrounds. Barring a dramatic last minute court-mandated extension, Florida counties face a 3 p.m. deadline to wrap up their machine recounts. Some counties have warned that they may not be able to make the deadline. The machine recount may essentially bring a conclusion to the governor's race. Republican Ron DeSantis leads Democrat Andrew Gillum by 0.41 percentage points in unofficial results, but the election won't be certified until Tuesday. Unofficial results in the U.S. Senate race have Republican Gov. Rick Scott ahead of Nelson by 0.14 percentage points, which will almost certainly send it to another recount that will last through the weekend.
The Latest on Florida's election recount (all times local): 3 p.m. Florida counties have reached the deadline for submitting the results of their election recounts. A federal judge earlier rejected a request to give counties more time beyond the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline to finish their recounts. Palm Beach County's election supervisor had warned that the county would not be able to complete the recount on time. The election will be certified Tuesday. The state's 67 counties were required to do machine recounts of more than 8 million ballots cast in the contentious midterms. The U.S. Senate and governor's races were among the three within the vote margin to trigger a machine recount. Several lawsuits have been filed by Democrats and Republicans in the wake of the close election. ___ 2 p.m. A federal judge is refusing to suspend looming election recount deadlines in the battleground state of Florida. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker on Thursday rejected a request by U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Democrats to give counties more time to finish recounts. All 67 counties are required to submit the results of a machine recount by 3 p.m. Palm Beach County's election supervisor has already warned that the county will not be able to finish on time. In his ruling, Walker said he was concerned that some counties may not complete their work by the deadline. But he said there is a lack of information on when Palm Beach County would wrap up its work. Walker said he cannot 'fashion a remedy in the dark.' ___ Noon The supervisor of elections in Florida's Palm Beach County said the likelihood of her office completing the recount by the state-mandated 3 p.m. deadline is 'very slim.' Susan Bucher defended her office Thursday morning, saying the incomplete recount wasn't 'for lack of human effort.' Bucher explained that the elections office in Riviera Beach shut down Wednesday night because 'when you work about 45 hours in a row, you have to let people sleep.' Bucher says she believes her office did everything it could despite not completing the U.S. Senate race recount. She blames aging equipment for the delays in meeting Thursday's deadline for machine recount results. ___ 10:15 a.m. A federal judge is sharply criticizing Florida legislators and elections officials in Palm Beach County for the state's chronic recount issues. During a hearing on whether to extend the 3 p.m. Thursday deadline in the state's recount for a U.S. Senate seat the governor's race, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker noted that Florida has a history of 'razor thin' elections, yet Palm Beach County delayed purchasing enough voting machines to handle a recount. Walker said Florida has been 'the laughing stock of the world election after election and we chose not to fix this.' The judge also said that the recount procedure in Florida law is written in a way that doesn't allow for possible problems. He suggested that runs against past federal court rulings, including the Bush v. Gore ruling that decided the 2000 presidential recount. ___ 7:45 a.m. A federal judge is giving thousands of Florida voters until this weekend to fix their ballots if they haven't been counted because of mismatched signatures. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled early Thursday that current Florida law on mail-in ballots places a substantial burden on voters. The ruling comes as Florida is wrapping up a recount in three statewide races. Walker did not go along with a request from Democrats to count all ballots with mismatched signatures. Instead he ordered that local election officials give voters until 5 p.m. Saturday to correct the problem so that their ballots can be counted. State officials testified in court that nearly 4,000 ballots have already been rejected because local canvassing boards decided the signature that was mailed-in doesn't match the signature on file. ___ 3 a.m. Florida's bumpy recount election reaches a pivotal point Thursday as most counties across the state complete reviews that could determine the next senator and governor in one of America's top political battlegrounds. Barring a dramatic last minute court-mandated extension, Florida counties face a 3 p.m. deadline to wrap up their machine recounts. Some counties have warned that they may not be able to make the deadline. The machine recount may essentially bring a conclusion to the governor's race. Republican Ron DeSantis leads Democrat Andrew Gillum by 0.41 percentage points in unofficial results, but the election won't be certified until Tuesday. Unofficial results in the U.S. Senate race have Republican Gov. Rick Scott ahead of Nelson by 0.14 percentage points, which will almost certainly send it to another recount that will last through the weekend.
Democrats continue 2018 election gains in House

In what has almost been a daily event since Election Day last week, Democrats won another GOP seat in the House on Thursday, as a new form of runoff election in Maine knocked off a Republican incumbent, increasing the gains of Democrats to 35 seats, with seven GOP seats still undecided.

In Maine, Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME) had asked a federal judge to block the final tabulation of results in his district under the format known as “ranked choice voting” – but the judge refused, saying that was a political question, as Maine voters had approved the new runoff format twice [More]