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Three Big Things
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Trump sets ‘major announcement’ Saturday on border wall fight

Trump sets ‘major announcement’ Saturday on border wall fight

After yet another day which featured no hints of progress in ending a funding fight that has to a partial government shutdown taking paychecks away from over 800,000 federal workers, President Donald Trump tweeted on Friday evening that he would make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday about his push to get money to build a wall along the Mexican border, which has led to an ongoing standoff with Democrats in Congress. “I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown,” the President wrote on Twitter, giving no details about what he might announce. With no indications that Democrats in Congress are ready to give in on their opposition to a border wall, some Republicans have continued to urge the President to declare a ‘national emergency’ under existing laws, and move money around in the military’s budget to build a wall. I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown, tomorrow afternoon at 3 P.M., live from the @WhiteHouse. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 18, 2019 “He ought to go ahead and declare an emergency, and it would be over,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK). “I don’t know why he is reluctant to do that.” Inhofe – who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee – said Thursday that he would not oppose the President dipping into military construction funds to build the wall, though other Republicans have publicly opposed the idea. Democrats on Friday also pressed the Department of Homeland Security on another front – using eminent domain to take land away from landowners, in order to build the way – focusing on a case involving the Catholic Church in Texas, which owns land that the Trump Administration wants. “The federal government must exercise extreme caution when seizing private property,” wrote Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer to the Homeland Security Secretary. To @SecNielsen: The Trump Administration’s lawsuit against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, Texas, raises important questions on the exercise of eminent domain to build a border wall. We ask you to respond to these questions by January 31: pic.twitter.com/MXcfoQib9E — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) January 18, 2019 The President has asked for $5.7 billion in border security money for both fencing and a wall; Democrats in Congress have offered $1.6 billion – the original requests of the Trump Administration and Republicans – but Democrats want none of that to go to the wall.

Report: Florida schools seeing 'critical shortage' of certified teachers

Report: Florida schools seeing 'critical shortage' of certified teachers

Florida schools are seeing a critical shortage of certified science, English and math teachers. A new report by the Florida Department of Education says those subjects are among areas where substantial proportions of teachers who are not certified in the appropriate field are being hired to teach those courses. “We have a shortage because people aren’t entering the teaching profession like they used to because there’s no security in teaching,” Renna Lee Paiva said. Paiva is president of the Clay County Education Association. She said those who have been in the education field for years are extremely concerned about the teacher shortage. In Duval County, a district spokesperson said there are 146 total vacancies at schools, with 21 open positions in math and four in science. In St. Johns County, the district had 28 unfilled positions as of Jan. 7, including four in math and science. Clay County Schools says it has 14 vacancies overall, with five in math and science. “We start to see fewer freshman coming in and saying, ‘I want to be an elementary teacher or I want to be a biology teacher,’” Paul Parkison, chair of the University of North Florida’s childhood education program, said. He told Action News Jax that the university starts recruitment early, educating incoming freshman about teaching opportunities. “We didn’t used to have to have those conversations, we’d have freshman coming in that were already excited about being teachers,” he said. “We actually initiated a couple programs that are targeted toward particularly the secondary, our UNF graduates who didn’t consider teacher as their primary major. Maybe they’re a history major or a biology major.” Local education experts, including Jacksonville Public Education Fund President Rachel Tutwiler Fortune, said the focus needs to be on higher pay. “There are many potential solutions, including higher pay and more career advancement opportunities,” she said in a statement. “Our pay scales, our benefits is all in jeopardy and it’s up to the legislators to fix it so we can give quality education to our kids -- which is our primary goal,” Paiva said. Full statement from JPEF: “The teacher shortage is a problem in Duval County as well as across our state and the nation, and there are many potential solutions, including higher pay and more career advancement opportunities. The Duval County School Board recently discussed one of these promising solutions -- creating a program to help public high students work toward a degree in education, in order to increase the number of aspiring teachers. This would be a win for Duval County students now and in the future, and we applaud Duval County Public Schools for exploring how we could adopt this innovative model -- known as 'grow your own teacher' -- in Jacksonville.”

Duval lawmaker files autonomous vehicle legislation in Florida

Duval lawmaker files autonomous vehicle legislation in Florida

You've been hearing the buzz about autonomous vehicles for a while, now lawmakers in Florida are discussing the possibility of making the futuristic form of transportation a reality. A state representative from Duval County has filed legislation to allow the development and deployment of those autonomous vehicles.  State Rep. Jason Fischer (R-Jacksonville) says as an engineer by trade, he understands the benefits autonomous vehicles would bring with them. He says if Florida were to ban those types of vehicles, it would stunt the state's potential for growth.  'Those engineers aren't going to move here. Those planners aren't going to move here. Those are high paying jobs,' Fischer says.  He says he can imagine Jacksonville as a place where football fans will be able to hop on driverless vehicles to take them to Jaguars games at TIAA Bank Field. He says the Skyway, linking one side of the St. Johns River to the other in downtown, is a prime example of something that could be updated if his bill goes through.  'We have a public transportation component that's already looking to go that way,' he says. 'My legislation would help enable them to move in that direction.'  Fischer says autonomous vehicles would also be a major help to the blind community. Both AARP Florida and the Florida Council of the Blind have offered their support for the legislation, saying their members will have more mobility opportunities if the bill goes through.  “For blind people, people living with disabilities and some senior citizens, self-driving cars will mean greater independence,” President of the Florida Council of the Blind Sheila Young says in a statement.  Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg) is sponsoring the companion measure in the Florida Senate. Fischer says he thinks the legislation should make it to the governor's desk within a couple months.

The old City Hall Annex is set for implosion this weekend, and there are important things to know if you plan to be within a few blocks of the 220 E Bay St. building when it happens. The implosion is scheduled for 8AM Sunday, January 20th. From 7AM through around 10AM, there will be restricted access to the area bordered by Main Street, Liberty Street, Adams Street, and the St. Johns River. Adams Street and southbound lanes of Main Street will be open, but northbound lanes of Main Street will be closed, as well as roads in that area. Foot traffic will also be prohibited within this “Exclusion Zone”, River traffic is restricted, and air traffic- including drones- is restricted to a half mile radius above the site. JSO will reopen access and roads, as clean-up efforts come to an end. If you’re required to be in the area, the City wants you to stay inside, with doors, windows, and entry ways closed and exhaust fans on. The City says noise and sound pressure levels could be harmful to your hearing, and lingering dust could pose a safety risk, especially if you have respiratory issues, which is why they want you to stay inside. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will communicate when access is restored within the Exclusion Zone. You will hear a series of sirens at 7:58AM, as a two-minute warning to the implosion. When the implosion is done- which is expected to be about five minutes later- there will be another siren sound. The City says anyone who is sheltering in place should continue doing that, because even when the implosion is done, falling debris could produce dust that could travel through the area, especially if there is wind. JSO will notify the public when it is safe to be outside. The City hopes that conducting the implosion on a Sunday will provide for the least amount of disruptions for you.
The old City Hall Annex is set for implosion this weekend, and there are important things to know if you plan to be within a few blocks of the 220 E Bay St. building when it happens. The implosion is scheduled for 8AM Sunday, January 20th. From 7AM through around 10AM, there will be restricted access to the area bordered by Main Street, Liberty Street, Adams Street, and the St. Johns River. Adams Street and southbound lanes of Main Street will be open, but northbound lanes of Main Street will be closed, as well as roads in that area. Foot traffic will also be prohibited within this “Exclusion Zone”, River traffic is restricted, and air traffic- including drones- is restricted to a half mile radius above the site. JSO will reopen access and roads, as clean-up efforts come to an end. If you’re required to be in the area, the City wants you to stay inside, with doors, windows, and entry ways closed and exhaust fans on. The City says noise and sound pressure levels could be harmful to your hearing, and lingering dust could pose a safety risk, especially if you have respiratory issues, which is why they want you to stay inside. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will communicate when access is restored within the Exclusion Zone. You will hear a series of sirens at 7:58AM, as a two-minute warning to the implosion. When the implosion is done- which is expected to be about five minutes later- there will be another siren sound. The City says anyone who is sheltering in place should continue doing that, because even when the implosion is done, falling debris could produce dust that could travel through the area, especially if there is wind. JSO will notify the public when it is safe to be outside. The City hopes that conducting the implosion on a Sunday will provide for the least amount of disruptions for you.
The old City Hall Annex is set for implosion this weekend, and there are important things to know if you plan to be within a few blocks of the 220 E Bay St. building when it happens. The implosion is scheduled for 8AM Sunday, January 20th. From 7AM through around 10AM, there will be restricted access to the area bordered by Main Street, Liberty Street, Adams Street, and the St. Johns River. Adams Street and southbound lanes of Main Street will be open, but northbound lanes of Main Street will be closed, as well as roads in that area. Foot traffic will also be prohibited within this “Exclusion Zone”, River traffic is restricted, and air traffic- including drones- is restricted to a half mile radius above the site. JSO will reopen access and roads, as clean-up efforts come to an end. If you’re required to be in the area, the City wants you to stay inside, with doors, windows, and entry ways closed and exhaust fans on. The City says noise and sound pressure levels could be harmful to your hearing, and lingering dust could pose a safety risk, especially if you have respiratory issues, which is why they want you to stay inside. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will communicate when access is restored within the Exclusion Zone. You will hear a series of sirens at 7:58AM, as a two-minute warning to the implosion. When the implosion is done- which is expected to be about five minutes later- there will be another siren sound. The City says anyone who is sheltering in place should continue doing that, because even when the implosion is done, falling debris could produce dust that could travel through the area, especially if there is wind. JSO will notify the public when it is safe to be outside. The City hopes that conducting the implosion on a Sunday will provide for the least amount of disruptions for you.
The old City Hall Annex is set for implosion this weekend, and there are important things to know if you plan to be within a few blocks of the 220 E Bay St. building when it happens. The implosion is scheduled for 8AM Sunday, January 20th. From 7AM through around 10AM, there will be restricted access to the area bordered by Main Street, Liberty Street, Adams Street, and the St. Johns River. Adams Street and southbound lanes of Main Street will be open, but northbound lanes of Main Street will be closed, as well as roads in that area. Foot traffic will also be prohibited within this “Exclusion Zone”, River traffic is restricted, and air traffic- including drones- is restricted to a half mile radius above the site. JSO will reopen access and roads, as clean-up efforts come to an end. If you’re required to be in the area, the City wants you to stay inside, with doors, windows, and entry ways closed and exhaust fans on. The City says noise and sound pressure levels could be harmful to your hearing, and lingering dust could pose a safety risk, especially if you have respiratory issues, which is why they want you to stay inside. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will communicate when access is restored within the Exclusion Zone. You will hear a series of sirens at 7:58AM, as a two-minute warning to the implosion. When the implosion is done- which is expected to be about five minutes later- there will be another siren sound. The City says anyone who is sheltering in place should continue doing that, because even when the implosion is done, falling debris could produce dust that could travel through the area, especially if there is wind. JSO will notify the public when it is safe to be outside. The City hopes that conducting the implosion on a Sunday will provide for the least amount of disruptions for you.
Trump sets ‘major announcement’ Saturday on border wall fight

After yet another day which featured no hints of progress in ending a funding fight that has to a partial government shutdown taking paychecks away from over 800,000 federal workers, President Donald Trump tweeted on Friday evening that he would make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday about his push to get money to build a wall along the Mexican border, which has led to an ongoing standoff with Democrats in Congress.

“I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown,” the President wrote on Twitter, giving no details about what he might [More]