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WANTED: JSO searching for “dangerous” armed robbery suspect

WANTED: JSO searching for “dangerous” armed robbery suspect

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is asking for your help tracking down an armed robbery suspect who they consider armed and dangerous. The suspect is 20-year-old Jebre Cook, who’s described as 5’9” and 174 lbs. Police say you should not approach him, because he is considered armed and dangerous.  JSO has not said what armed robbery incident they believe Cook is responsible for. If you know anything about Cook’s location, you’re asked to contact JSO at 911 or 904-630-0500, or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. You can also submit an anonymous tip and be eligible for a possible $3,000 reward by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.

Jacksonville man arrested for kidnapping, rape, carjacking

Jacksonville man arrested for kidnapping, rape, carjacking

A 20-year-old Jacksonville man has been arrested after allegedly kidnapping a woman at gunpoint, raping her, and stealing her car. The arrest report for Billy Gaines says he first approached the victim late Sunday at a gas station on Lem Turner Road, where he put a gun to her back and told her to get in the car. JSO says they drove off, but at one point he stopped the car and raped her in the back seat, while he was still holding the gun. The victim reported that they then went to the home of a friend of Gaines, and she then told Gaines something that led him to drive her to another location, according to the arrest report. At that location, police say the victim went inside, called police, and did not come back out. Gaines allegedly fled in the victim’s vehicle. Early Sunday, a patrol Sergeant searching for the suspect saw a vehicle matching the description, while on Golfair Blvd near I-95. JSO says Gaines sped up and took evasive actions. Several marked vehicles continued to pursue him, and he was ultimately stopped in a vacant lot. Gaines allegedly fled on foot from that point, but was caught soon after. He has been arrested for armed sexual battery, kidnapping, carjacking with a firearm, fleeing law enforcement, and resisting an officer without violence.

Trump ban on ‘bump stocks’ to face immediate legal challenge

Trump ban on ‘bump stocks’ to face immediate legal challenge

Hours after the Trump Administration signaled that it would administratively move to ban ‘bump stocks,’ which allow semi-automatic weapons to be fired at a much more rapid rate, lawmakers in both parties said it was time for the Congress to enact those regulations into law, as opponents of the decision vowed to immediately challenge the President’s plan in court. “We will be filing our lawsuit very, very soon,” the Gun Owners of America said in a written statement. “After all, in the coming days, an estimated half a million bump stock owners will have the difficult decision of either destroying or surrendering their valuable property – or else risk felony prosecution,” the group added. At the White House, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed that is the plan, making clear that bump stocks will be illegal as of March 21, 2019. On banning bump stocks, Sanders says people have until March 2019 to turn them in or have them destroyed. Says they fall under same guidelines as machine guns. — Dana Brown Ritter (@danabrownritter) December 18, 2018 “A 90 period now begins which persons in possession of bump stock type devices must turn those devices to an ATF field office, or destroy them by March 21,” Sanders said at the White House briefing. Justice Department officials told reporters on Tuesday that bump stocks will be administratively banned by using language from a federal law which prohibits machine guns. There was no immediate comment from the National Rifle Association on whether that group would join in legal action against bump stocks as well. In Congress, lawmakers in both parties said while the President’s step is overdue, the House and Senate should also vote to codify the bump stock ban. “This is good news, but it is just one small step toward stopping mass shootings,” said Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-NH). “We must do far more to prevent gun violence.” “There’s no justification for bump stocks that transform semi-automatic weapons into machine guns,” said Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME). A regulation – not a law – is finally being issued to ban bump stocks. This is welcome news. But the country shouldn’t have had to wait a year+ after Vegas to get the most basic regulation. It’s testament to how hard we’ll need to fight to get the comprehensive gun safety we need https://t.co/LgjgBcAhxv — Ed Markey (@SenMarkey) December 18, 2018 “The President seems to be more interested in making headlines than making progress,” said Rep. Dina Titus (D-NV). “We know that his proposal will likely be tied up in the courts.” 58 people were killed in Titus’ district in Las Vegas on October 1, 2017, when a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert, using ‘bump stocks’ to allow him to shoot more ammunition more quickly, in what was the deadliest mass shooting in the United States. “Finally and should be codified,” said Rep. Carlos Cubelo (R-FL), one of the few Republicans who has called for action on bump stocks in Congress.

World stocks stabilized Tuesday, with Wall Street expected to edge up after heavy losses the day before, as traders prepare for a likely interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve. KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, Germany's DAX was 0.5 percent higher at 10,820 after falling into a bear market on Monday. France's CAC 40 was flat at 4,801 and Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 0.5 percent to 6,740. WALL STREET: On Monday, broad selling knocked U.S. indexes to their lowest levels in over a year. Investors sold almost everything, from technology and retail stocks to steadier high-dividend companies. Less than 40 of the 500 stocks in the broad S&P 500 index finished the day higher. Stocks were set to recover slightly on Tuesday. S&P 500 and Dow futures both rose 0.3 percent. FED MEETING: The Federal Open Market Committee begins a two-day meeting on Tuesday. It is expected to raise its short-term interest rate by a modest quarter-point, to a range of 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent a day later. The rate is used as a benchmark for many consumer and business loans. Investors fear more monetary tightening would weigh on U.S. growth, and eventually, the global economy, which is already expected to slow in 2019 because of trade tensions. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was 'incredible' the Fed was considering another rate hike, with 'a very strong dollar and virtually no inflation.' The central bank forecasts three more rate hikes in 2019. ANALYST'S TAKE: 'Despite Donald Trump's recent overture, the Fed looks set to hike rates again on Wednesday with market players anxious to see if the economy can handle more policy tightening given expectations for slowing growth,' ING economists Nicholas Mapa and Prakash Sakpal said in a commentary. GERMANY GLOOM: Business confidence took a hit in Europe's largest economy. The Ifo Institute said Tuesday its business confidence index dropped to 101.0 points for December from 102.0 points in November as managers' view of both their current circumstances and their prospects for the next six months fell. That comes as the German DAX stock index entered a bear market this week, down over 20 percent from a January high. ASIA'S DAY: Japan's Nikkei 225 index was 1.8 percent lower at 21,115.45 and the Kospi in South Korea dropped 0.4 percent to 2,062.11. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 1.1 percent to 25,814.25. The Shanghai Composite index dipped 0.8 percent to 2,576.65. Australia's S&P ASX 200 was down 1.2 percent at 5,589.50. Shares were lower in Taiwan and Southeast Asia. ENERGY: Oil prices tumbled on worries about oversupply and softening growth in China, which could hit demand. Benchmark U.S. crude shed $1.34 to $48.54 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped $1.32 on Monday. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gave up $1.37 to $58.24 a barrel. It lost 67 cents the day before. CURRENCIES: The dollar weakened to 112.27 yen from 112.83 yen in late trading Monday. The euro rose to $1.1395 from $1.1349.
World stocks stabilized Tuesday, with Wall Street expected to edge up after heavy losses the day before, as traders prepare for a likely interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve. KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, Germany's DAX was 0.5 percent higher at 10,820 after falling into a bear market on Monday. France's CAC 40 was flat at 4,801 and Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 0.5 percent to 6,740. WALL STREET: On Monday, broad selling knocked U.S. indexes to their lowest levels in over a year. Investors sold almost everything, from technology and retail stocks to steadier high-dividend companies. Less than 40 of the 500 stocks in the broad S&P 500 index finished the day higher. Stocks were set to recover slightly on Tuesday. S&P 500 and Dow futures both rose 0.3 percent. FED MEETING: The Federal Open Market Committee begins a two-day meeting on Tuesday. It is expected to raise its short-term interest rate by a modest quarter-point, to a range of 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent a day later. The rate is used as a benchmark for many consumer and business loans. Investors fear more monetary tightening would weigh on U.S. growth, and eventually, the global economy, which is already expected to slow in 2019 because of trade tensions. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was 'incredible' the Fed was considering another rate hike, with 'a very strong dollar and virtually no inflation.' The central bank forecasts three more rate hikes in 2019. ANALYST'S TAKE: 'Despite Donald Trump's recent overture, the Fed looks set to hike rates again on Wednesday with market players anxious to see if the economy can handle more policy tightening given expectations for slowing growth,' ING economists Nicholas Mapa and Prakash Sakpal said in a commentary. GERMANY GLOOM: Business confidence took a hit in Europe's largest economy. The Ifo Institute said Tuesday its business confidence index dropped to 101.0 points for December from 102.0 points in November as managers' view of both their current circumstances and their prospects for the next six months fell. That comes as the German DAX stock index entered a bear market this week, down over 20 percent from a January high. ASIA'S DAY: Japan's Nikkei 225 index was 1.8 percent lower at 21,115.45 and the Kospi in South Korea dropped 0.4 percent to 2,062.11. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 1.1 percent to 25,814.25. The Shanghai Composite index dipped 0.8 percent to 2,576.65. Australia's S&P ASX 200 was down 1.2 percent at 5,589.50. Shares were lower in Taiwan and Southeast Asia. ENERGY: Oil prices tumbled on worries about oversupply and softening growth in China, which could hit demand. Benchmark U.S. crude shed $1.34 to $48.54 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped $1.32 on Monday. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gave up $1.37 to $58.24 a barrel. It lost 67 cents the day before. CURRENCIES: The dollar weakened to 112.27 yen from 112.83 yen in late trading Monday. The euro rose to $1.1395 from $1.1349.
World stocks stabilized Tuesday, with Wall Street expected to edge up after heavy losses the day before, as traders prepare for a likely interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve. KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, Germany's DAX was 0.5 percent higher at 10,820 after falling into a bear market on Monday. France's CAC 40 was flat at 4,801 and Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 0.5 percent to 6,740. WALL STREET: On Monday, broad selling knocked U.S. indexes to their lowest levels in over a year. Investors sold almost everything, from technology and retail stocks to steadier high-dividend companies. Less than 40 of the 500 stocks in the broad S&P 500 index finished the day higher. Stocks were set to recover slightly on Tuesday. S&P 500 and Dow futures both rose 0.3 percent. FED MEETING: The Federal Open Market Committee begins a two-day meeting on Tuesday. It is expected to raise its short-term interest rate by a modest quarter-point, to a range of 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent a day later. The rate is used as a benchmark for many consumer and business loans. Investors fear more monetary tightening would weigh on U.S. growth, and eventually, the global economy, which is already expected to slow in 2019 because of trade tensions. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was 'incredible' the Fed was considering another rate hike, with 'a very strong dollar and virtually no inflation.' The central bank forecasts three more rate hikes in 2019. ANALYST'S TAKE: 'Despite Donald Trump's recent overture, the Fed looks set to hike rates again on Wednesday with market players anxious to see if the economy can handle more policy tightening given expectations for slowing growth,' ING economists Nicholas Mapa and Prakash Sakpal said in a commentary. GERMANY GLOOM: Business confidence took a hit in Europe's largest economy. The Ifo Institute said Tuesday its business confidence index dropped to 101.0 points for December from 102.0 points in November as managers' view of both their current circumstances and their prospects for the next six months fell. That comes as the German DAX stock index entered a bear market this week, down over 20 percent from a January high. ASIA'S DAY: Japan's Nikkei 225 index was 1.8 percent lower at 21,115.45 and the Kospi in South Korea dropped 0.4 percent to 2,062.11. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 1.1 percent to 25,814.25. The Shanghai Composite index dipped 0.8 percent to 2,576.65. Australia's S&P ASX 200 was down 1.2 percent at 5,589.50. Shares were lower in Taiwan and Southeast Asia. ENERGY: Oil prices tumbled on worries about oversupply and softening growth in China, which could hit demand. Benchmark U.S. crude shed $1.34 to $48.54 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped $1.32 on Monday. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gave up $1.37 to $58.24 a barrel. It lost 67 cents the day before. CURRENCIES: The dollar weakened to 112.27 yen from 112.83 yen in late trading Monday. The euro rose to $1.1395 from $1.1349.
World stocks stabilized Tuesday, with Wall Street expected to edge up after heavy losses the day before, as traders prepare for a likely interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve. KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, Germany's DAX was 0.5 percent higher at 10,820 after falling into a bear market on Monday. France's CAC 40 was flat at 4,801 and Britain's FTSE 100 index fell 0.5 percent to 6,740. WALL STREET: On Monday, broad selling knocked U.S. indexes to their lowest levels in over a year. Investors sold almost everything, from technology and retail stocks to steadier high-dividend companies. Less than 40 of the 500 stocks in the broad S&P 500 index finished the day higher. Stocks were set to recover slightly on Tuesday. S&P 500 and Dow futures both rose 0.3 percent. FED MEETING: The Federal Open Market Committee begins a two-day meeting on Tuesday. It is expected to raise its short-term interest rate by a modest quarter-point, to a range of 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent a day later. The rate is used as a benchmark for many consumer and business loans. Investors fear more monetary tightening would weigh on U.S. growth, and eventually, the global economy, which is already expected to slow in 2019 because of trade tensions. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was 'incredible' the Fed was considering another rate hike, with 'a very strong dollar and virtually no inflation.' The central bank forecasts three more rate hikes in 2019. ANALYST'S TAKE: 'Despite Donald Trump's recent overture, the Fed looks set to hike rates again on Wednesday with market players anxious to see if the economy can handle more policy tightening given expectations for slowing growth,' ING economists Nicholas Mapa and Prakash Sakpal said in a commentary. GERMANY GLOOM: Business confidence took a hit in Europe's largest economy. The Ifo Institute said Tuesday its business confidence index dropped to 101.0 points for December from 102.0 points in November as managers' view of both their current circumstances and their prospects for the next six months fell. That comes as the German DAX stock index entered a bear market this week, down over 20 percent from a January high. ASIA'S DAY: Japan's Nikkei 225 index was 1.8 percent lower at 21,115.45 and the Kospi in South Korea dropped 0.4 percent to 2,062.11. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 1.1 percent to 25,814.25. The Shanghai Composite index dipped 0.8 percent to 2,576.65. Australia's S&P ASX 200 was down 1.2 percent at 5,589.50. Shares were lower in Taiwan and Southeast Asia. ENERGY: Oil prices tumbled on worries about oversupply and softening growth in China, which could hit demand. Benchmark U.S. crude shed $1.34 to $48.54 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped $1.32 on Monday. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gave up $1.37 to $58.24 a barrel. It lost 67 cents the day before. CURRENCIES: The dollar weakened to 112.27 yen from 112.83 yen in late trading Monday. The euro rose to $1.1395 from $1.1349.
Trump ban on ‘bump stocks’ to face immediate legal challenge

Hours after the Trump Administration signaled that it would administratively move to ban ‘bump stocks,’ which allow semi-automatic weapons to be fired at a much more rapid rate, lawmakers in both parties said it was time for the Congress to enact those regulations into law, as opponents of the decision vowed to immediately challenge the President’s plan in court.

“We will be filing our lawsuit very, very soon,” the Gun Owners of America said in a written statement.

“After all, in the coming days, an estimated half a million bump stock owners will have the difficult decision of either destroying [More]