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Explicit video shared from Mississippi teacher's phone, officials say

Explicit video shared from Mississippi teacher's phone, officials say

Officials are investigating after an explicit video was shared “inadvertently and unknowingly” from a Mississippi teacher’s phone, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to a statement from Horn Lake police, the department received information regarding the video Wednesday.  DeSoto County Schools are conducting an investigation into the video, which reportedly showed explicit content of a teacher in the district. Police said if there was a “criminal element regarding the release of the video,” Horn Lake officers will then initiate a full investigation. School officials have not identified the teacher who was seen in the video, and the contents of the video have not been released at this time. The school district did confirm to WHBQ that the teacher involved is no longer an employee there. Again, officials told WHBQ that the video was shared without the teacher’s knowledge.

7 shot, injured at toddler's birthday party in Maryland, police say

7 shot, injured at toddler's birthday party in Maryland, police say

Several people were injured Saturday when someone opened fire at a toddler's birthday party in Maryland, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to WRC-TV, three people were seriously wounded in the shooting, which occurred Saturday night during a party for a 2-year-old at a Camp Springs apartment complex. Four others suffered 'less serious injuries,' the station reported. The victims, ages 18 to 20, should recover from their injuries, the Prince George's County Police Department said. Authorities have not arrested anyone in connection with the shooting, WRC reported. No further information was immediately available. Read more here.

Must-see: 5-year-old girl's hilarious back-to-school photos go viral

Must-see: 5-year-old girl's hilarious back-to-school photos go viral

And you thought your workday was challenging. >> Read more trending news  A girl from Scotland has gained viral fame after her mother shared two hilarious photos showing just how hectic the first day of school can be. According to the Barrhead News, Jillian Falconer of East Renfrewshire said she snapped the first picture of her daughter, Lucie, before she headed to her first day at Neilston Primary School. In the snapshot, the 5-year-old, clad in a uniform with her hair tied neatly with a bow, happily smiles for the camera. But that all changed by the time Lucie returned home hours later, her mom told the news outlet. In a second photo, Lucie appears to scowl, her sweater drooping as one knee-sock pools around her ankle. 'Her dad asked how she got on during the day, so I sent him the picture of Lucie just to show that obviously, she had an eventful day,' Falconer told the 'Today' show. The Barrhead News posted the images Wednesday on Facebook. By Sunday morning, they had been shared more than 21,000 times. The good news? Despite appearances, Lucie actually had a fun day, her mom said. 'I asked her what she had been doing at school, and she said, 'Oh, nothing, I just played with my friends,'' Falconer told the Barrhead News. The good news? Despite appearances, Lucie actually had a fun day, her mom said. 'I asked her what she had been doing at school, and she said, 'Oh, nothing, I just played with my friends,'' Falconer told the Barrhead News. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  Read more here or here. >> See the photos here

[Don’t see the video? Click here] We open with a producer off-camera asking, “Can you give us a brief explanation of what’s going on with your voice?”  Jamie Dupree, dressed for Capitol Hill, immediately begins writing down his response on his tablet. He looks up at the camera with a smirk and simply replies, “No.”  In essence, the documentary ‘Voice of Reason’ is the story of Jamie Dupree’s return to air. But, Jamie’s story transcends radio waves.  Directed by Cox Media Group-Atlanta Videographer Jesse Brooks, ‘Voice of Reason’ is a story of triumph and how in Jamie’s words, despite life’s adversity, “There is no reason to give up.”  As a Cox Media Group Washington Correspondent, Jamie spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill. Nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.  Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak. “It’s hard, but I’m working to come back hard,” Jamie said.  As it became obvious in the last year that his voice was not coming back, Jamie doubled down his efforts to find answers. And that’s when Mike Lupo at Cox Media Group’s corporate headquarters contacted a company in Scotland called CereProc.  With innovative technology, CereProc developed a special voice app that allows Jamie to use a simple text-to-speech program to generate news reports in his old voice.  ‘Voice of Reason,’ which became a labor of love for CMG Atlanta’s Jesse Brooks, delves deeper into CereProc’s technology and Jamie’s emotional journey over the past few years  The documentary is peppered with moving interviews with Jamie’s colleagues, and even a few candid glimpses of Jamie with his kids.  He’s thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that’s not what Jamie says hurts him the most.  “Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”  Specialists at Emory University in Atlanta are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of Jamie’s tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.  “Let’s be frank about this whole situation -- this sucks,” Jamie tells producers in ‘Voice of Reason,’ adding through misty eyes, “But there is no reason to quit.  “There is no reason to stop trying. And so I’m not going to stop trying.”
[Don’t see the video? Click here] We open with a producer off-camera asking, “Can you give us a brief explanation of what’s going on with your voice?”  Jamie Dupree, dressed for Capitol Hill, immediately begins writing down his response on his tablet. He looks up at the camera with a smirk and simply replies, “No.”  In essence, the documentary ‘Voice of Reason’ is the story of Jamie Dupree’s return to air. But, Jamie’s story transcends radio waves.  Directed by Cox Media Group-Atlanta Videographer Jesse Brooks, ‘Voice of Reason’ is a story of triumph and how in Jamie’s words, despite life’s adversity, “There is no reason to give up.”  As a Cox Media Group Washington Correspondent, Jamie spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill. Nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.  Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak. “It’s hard, but I’m working to come back hard,” Jamie said.  As it became obvious in the last year that his voice was not coming back, Jamie doubled down his efforts to find answers. And that’s when Mike Lupo at Cox Media Group’s corporate headquarters contacted a company in Scotland called CereProc.  With innovative technology, CereProc developed a special voice app that allows Jamie to use a simple text-to-speech program to generate news reports in his old voice.  ‘Voice of Reason,’ which became a labor of love for CMG Atlanta’s Jesse Brooks, delves deeper into CereProc’s technology and Jamie’s emotional journey over the past few years  The documentary is peppered with moving interviews with Jamie’s colleagues, and even a few candid glimpses of Jamie with his kids.  He’s thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that’s not what Jamie says hurts him the most.  “Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”  Specialists at Emory University in Atlanta are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of Jamie’s tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.  “Let’s be frank about this whole situation -- this sucks,” Jamie tells producers in ‘Voice of Reason,’ adding through misty eyes, “But there is no reason to quit.  “There is no reason to stop trying. And so I’m not going to stop trying.”
[Don’t see the video? Click here] We open with a producer off-camera asking, “Can you give us a brief explanation of what’s going on with your voice?”  Jamie Dupree, dressed for Capitol Hill, immediately begins writing down his response on his tablet. He looks up at the camera with a smirk and simply replies, “No.”  In essence, the documentary ‘Voice of Reason’ is the story of Jamie Dupree’s return to air. But, Jamie’s story transcends radio waves.  Directed by Cox Media Group-Atlanta Videographer Jesse Brooks, ‘Voice of Reason’ is a story of triumph and how in Jamie’s words, despite life’s adversity, “There is no reason to give up.”  As a Cox Media Group Washington Correspondent, Jamie spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill. Nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.  Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak. “It’s hard, but I’m working to come back hard,” Jamie said.  As it became obvious in the last year that his voice was not coming back, Jamie doubled down his efforts to find answers. And that’s when Mike Lupo at Cox Media Group’s corporate headquarters contacted a company in Scotland called CereProc.  With innovative technology, CereProc developed a special voice app that allows Jamie to use a simple text-to-speech program to generate news reports in his old voice.  ‘Voice of Reason,’ which became a labor of love for CMG Atlanta’s Jesse Brooks, delves deeper into CereProc’s technology and Jamie’s emotional journey over the past few years  The documentary is peppered with moving interviews with Jamie’s colleagues, and even a few candid glimpses of Jamie with his kids.  He’s thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that’s not what Jamie says hurts him the most.  “Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”  Specialists at Emory University in Atlanta are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of Jamie’s tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.  “Let’s be frank about this whole situation -- this sucks,” Jamie tells producers in ‘Voice of Reason,’ adding through misty eyes, “But there is no reason to quit.  “There is no reason to stop trying. And so I’m not going to stop trying.”
[Don’t see the video? Click here] We open with a producer off-camera asking, “Can you give us a brief explanation of what’s going on with your voice?”  Jamie Dupree, dressed for Capitol Hill, immediately begins writing down his response on his tablet. He looks up at the camera with a smirk and simply replies, “No.”  In essence, the documentary ‘Voice of Reason’ is the story of Jamie Dupree’s return to air. But, Jamie’s story transcends radio waves.  Directed by Cox Media Group-Atlanta Videographer Jesse Brooks, ‘Voice of Reason’ is a story of triumph and how in Jamie’s words, despite life’s adversity, “There is no reason to give up.”  As a Cox Media Group Washington Correspondent, Jamie spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill. Nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.  Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak. “It’s hard, but I’m working to come back hard,” Jamie said.  As it became obvious in the last year that his voice was not coming back, Jamie doubled down his efforts to find answers. And that’s when Mike Lupo at Cox Media Group’s corporate headquarters contacted a company in Scotland called CereProc.  With innovative technology, CereProc developed a special voice app that allows Jamie to use a simple text-to-speech program to generate news reports in his old voice.  ‘Voice of Reason,’ which became a labor of love for CMG Atlanta’s Jesse Brooks, delves deeper into CereProc’s technology and Jamie’s emotional journey over the past few years  The documentary is peppered with moving interviews with Jamie’s colleagues, and even a few candid glimpses of Jamie with his kids.  He’s thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that’s not what Jamie says hurts him the most.  “Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”  Specialists at Emory University in Atlanta are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of Jamie’s tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.  “Let’s be frank about this whole situation -- this sucks,” Jamie tells producers in ‘Voice of Reason,’ adding through misty eyes, “But there is no reason to quit.  “There is no reason to stop trying. And so I’m not going to stop trying.”
TRADE WAR: China, Trump ratchet up tensions with new tariffs On a day of big losses on the stock markets sparked first by China levying new tariffs on imports from America, President Donald Trump wasted no time Friday afternoon in announcing higher import duties against the Chinese, plunging the two countries even deeper into an economic standoff which could have negative worldwide ramifications. 'China should not have put new Tariffs on 75 BILLION DOLLARS of United States product,' the President tweeted about an hour after the close on Wall Street, where the Dow Jones dropped over 600 points. 'Starting on October 1st, the 250 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, currently being taxed at 25%, will be taxed at 30%,' the President wrote.  'Additionally, the remaining 300 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, that was being taxed from September 1st at 10%, will now be taxed at 15%,' he added. The President also called on American companies to take their manufacturing businesses out of China, arguing that the United States was the victim of an 'unfair Trading Relationship.' 'Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing your companies HOME and making your products in the USA,' Mr. Trump tweeted. The White House did not provide any explanation as to how the President would have the power to force U.S. companies to abandon their manufacturing operations in China. Economic experts and businesses were worried by the days events. “(T)his is a major risk as it's the economy - households and businesses - that are in play,” said Gregory Daco of Oxford Economics. “The administration's approach clearly isn't working, and the answer isn't more taxes on American businesses and consumers,” said the National Retail Federation. “Where does this end?'  “These added tariffs will ratchet up consumer prices, stall business investment, escalate uncertainty and cost American jobs,” said the pro-free trade group Tariffs Hurt the Heartland. “In just the past three years, U.S. soybean exports to China have fallen nearly 80 percent, and once these tariffs kick in, things are likely to get worse,” said Roger Johnson, the head of the National Farmers Union.  The standoff with China was a far cry from President Trump's prediction in March of 2018, when he wrote on Twitter that trade wars are 'easy to win.' As for Democrats - even though many of them would like to see the United States be more forceful with China - their answer is not retaliatory tariffs and a trade war. “Our economy is showing signs of weakening due to the president’s trade war, and these back-and-forth tariffs will only make things worse,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). “The facts are clear: President Trump's destabilizing and reckless trade war is undermining growth,” said Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA). “Your tariffs are hurting our country badly,” said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). “There's nothing funny about tanking people's retirement accounts with a failed trade war,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA).